Thursday, May 12, 2016

Private Meditation as a Revolutionary Act

For Nietzsche, beauty is NOT primarily transcendent. Beauty is the difficult marriage of the transcendent with the immanent.

Unfortunately, our society has not heeded his advice. We have only accelerated the patriarchal addiction to transcendence, which, due to market competition for funding, has spread to every field. The easiest, and therefore best economic strategy, to receive funding is to dazzle the customer/donor/viewer.

Private meditation is dangerous to the whole idea.

The first commandment of American economic life is 'thou shalt appear constantly busy.' Even when there is nothing to do, we are strongly pressured to maintain an appearance of activity to others, or risk being labelled as "no fun" or depressed. To disrupt the appearance of activity is to call into question the premise on which our entire economic structure is based: our insatiable addiction to be dazzled by new products and consumer experiences. To say “no” to transcendence in this regard, even for a moment to desire balance instead, is outright rebellion.

Industry brings Meditation into relatively public group settings so that it, too, becomes a choice for consumption, becomes yet another stage where our addiction to transcendence can repeat its performance.

Rather than seeing our societal addiction as needing more rules, more techniques so that it can be controlled, imagine addiction as a frustrated passion frantically seeking a new mode of expression. That gives me hope.

This post is a slightly altered combination of a couple posts 2 years ago.

Saturday, January 02, 2016

Slavoj Žižek on Why He Calls Himself a Communist

In some sense, I still consider myself a communist . Why?

The conflict, which is presented to us by the media and so on, as the main conflictbetween tolerant democratic openness and fundamentalismthis conflict, with which we are bombarded, is in some sense a false conflict. Something is missing in the equation. I think that both poles, here caught into each other, are part of the same self-propelling movement. What is missing is the left. And I here I follow Walter Benjamin who said that (accepting the designation of fundamentalism as fascism) that every fascism is a sign of a failed revolution. It’s easy to mock—"Ho, ho, ho. The left is over; it died"Yes. That’s why we have what we have today.

Second thing, the next question. Maybe liberal capitalism works. I’m the first to admit that, let’s be frank… There was no society in entire human history where such a large number of people lived such relatively comfortable, safe, and free lives as they did in Western Europe in the last fifty, sixty years. But I see dark spots, dangers on the horizon. And now I come to the crucial question—to put it in these bombastic, old Marxist terms. Are there antagonisms visible, which we will not be able to solve, with the means of global capitalism as we have it today? I think there are.

(A) Ecology. I know the market works wonders and so on, but I claim... the risks are too high. (B) Biogenetics. Even Fukuyama, as we know, he changed his position. He admits now that the biogenetic prospect ruins his notion of the end of history. (C) Then we have the problem of intellectual property. I claim intellectual property is a notion which, in the long term, will not be able to include it into private property. There is something in intellectual property which is, as it were, in its nature communist. It resists private property.

And (D) the last point, new walls everywhere, new forms of apartheid, and so on and so on. It is as if ironically the truth of globalization is not just that Berlin Wall fell. Berlin Wall fell, but now we have new walls all around. And again, I don’t have any naïveté here, I am not saying oh, there will be a new Leninist Party. No, that story is definitely over, I agree with you. Why communism? Because (a), all these problems that I indicated, ecology, intellectual property, and so on, are problems of commons, of something which is the shared substance of our life. And some—in ecology, it’s clear, some kind of new form of collective activity, but I totally agree with you, nothing to do with Communist Party, state, or whatever, that story’s over.

We’ll have to be inventive.

If not, if the system as it is will go on and on and on, then I think something will be going on which I fear very much. What in some of my books I called a “soft revolution.” We are not even aware of how, slowly, things are already regressing. At the level of ethical standards, even. For example, do you agree with this? When friends tell me, “Why such a fuss about Guantanamo, torturing, but isn’t it clear that in China they torture infinitely more?” I say, “Absolutely,” I am not a hypocrite here. But what matters to me is surface appearances. What worries me is that twenty, thirty years ago, if somebody were to advocate publicly torture, he or she would have been dismissed as an idiot. Like you don’t even have to argue. It would have been the same as to argue about rape. I would be very worried if I we re to live in a society where one would have to argue all the time that one shouldn’t rape women, how should I put it, no? 

And it’s not only the fact that we talk about torture in this way and numerous other facts, point toward something which I find a little bit worrisome... The problem is how “tolerance” overlaps with new forms of oppression, paradoxically, with new forms of censorships and so on and so on. So I find that, although apparently we don’t live in dynamic times in the sense of big struggles, sooner or later we will have somehow to confront the problem, which was at the same time the basic problem of communism and the problem basically also of ’68. Let’s not forget: ’68 was also a radical questioning of the existing global system.

Friday, January 01, 2016

On Deconstructing Our Fortresses of Thought

“A country may be overrun by an armed host, but it is only conquered by the establishment of fortresses. Words are the fortresses of thought. They enable us to realize our dominion over what we have already overrun in thought.” - William Hamilton

[W]e wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places... Stand therefore, having your loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of righteousness;  and your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace; above all, taking the shield of faith, wherewith ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked. And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.” - Ephesians 6:12-18

Hamilton’s metaphor characterizes the dominant approach to knowledge in the West. Our universities are structured to create a firm base of facts and knowledge about each field that the totality of human thought has been so neatly divided up and distributed down through the academic bureaucracy.

What Hamilton’s metaphor misses is that words don’t have to be fortresses. Better than fortresses are cultural exchange and mutual appreciation, which have grown out of economic relationships. These interactions keep the peace more effectively than fortresses, because they are flexible and mobile by nature rather than rigid and stationary.

While all our social institutions have forsaken flexibility in favor of rigid dogmatic procedures to varying degrees, I believe in mathematics, we find the tallest, most barricaded fortress. 

A Brief History of the Relationship Between Mathematics and Science

Everyone is familiar with Isaac Newton’s Theory of Gravity--the apple falls from the tree in the same way that the Earth “falls” in an orbit around the Sun, and that the moon “falls” in an orbit around the Earth. But have you ever considered how exactly gravity works? What’s the mechanism that causes the gravitational attraction between the Earth and the Sun, which is over 91 million miles away? How does the moon know that it’s supposed to keep circling around the earth, month after month after month? We know that the attraction increases proportionally to the mass of the objects, but why? If I want to keep a dog from running away from me, I need a leash or some device, at least. How does the Sun’s gravity pull the Earth onto its orbital path? Many scientists, from Isaac Newton to Stephen Hawking, have asked themselves this question, but there is still no definitive theory. Einstein’s Theory claims that “gravity is the curvature of space”, but this again just begs the question: “How does mass cause space to bend?” The leading mainstream theory--”gravitons”--still has no experimental backing whatsoever, and would explain very little anyway (Are gravitons a wave or a particle? etc.) We know that gravity “works” (well enough for measurements on Earth’s surface, at least), but we have never known how.  

So in science, while we can make accurate predictions about the real-world, in physics, chemistry, biology, etc., we rarely have a good explanation for why those predictions are true.

Mathematics *should* be the opposite of this situation. 

Mathematics is the construction of symbols that in some way model reality, and we should be able to explain everything about the model, even if we still are clueless about reality. Knowing why everything works is what makes math interesting to me, and I believe, why its partnership with the sciences [see: Eric Temple Bell] has proven so successful over the past 400 years.

Tobias Dantzig writes a wonderful analogy explaining the nature of mathematics:
The mathematician may be compared to a designer of garments, who is utterly oblivious of the creatures whom his garments may fit. To be sure, his art originated in the necessity for clothing such creatures, but this was long ago; to this day a shape will occasionally appear which will fit into the garment as if the garment had been made for it. Then there is no end of surprise and of delight! - Numbers: The Language of Science. p. 240

No self-respecting mathematician would disagree with the idea that mathematics must, above all else, be explainable down to the level of axioms. But can this approach be taken too far? Can mathematicians become so obsessed with designing their garments that they disconnect from the world completely, such that none of their garments fit any more?

This is precisely what happened, culminating one hundred years ago in a famous [within mathematics, at least] controversy between two schools of thought: Formalism and Intuitionism.

Due primarily to Formalism’s victory in the controversy, most mathematicians today view math in precisely this way. Formalists focus on the development of language tools (algorithms), while disregarding the practical question of when and where they are useful. As a result we have such abstract theoretical fields as non-Euclidean geometry and topology, with no practical applications. 

David and Ellen Kaplan in their book The Art of the Infinite
compare the Formalism of David Hilbert to Medieval theology:
The medieval view was that creatures-the created-glorify God; so if there were more creatures, then the greater would be the glorification. Hence if something could possibly exist, it would exist. The world-as crowded with beings as the Unicorn Tapestry-would then more loudly sing God’s praise. ln Hilbert’s terms this would translate to: since that which is consistent can exist, therefore it must. From this medieval standpoint, proving consistency would be enough to guarantee existence. Is it conceivable that Hilbert himself ever held this view? Could mathematical existence have meant this much-not this little-to him? - The Art of the Infinite, p. 51

Intuitionist mathematicians, on the other hand, view mathematics holistically within a broader social context. Mathematics is a technology, just like any other. We can greatly increase the number of “garment that fits” by identifying current problems in today’s world that can most benefit from the systematic approach that mathematics provides.  Intuitionists are more open to the search for space where our mathematical language-programs can usefully operate.

Why did Formalism win out? Ernst Snapper (Dartmouth College), in his essay on the [lack of a] philosophical foundation for mathematics, has this to say:

“These three reasons [Formalism being “more elegant”, classical proofs that Intuitionists reject, and Intuitionist proofs that are classically false] for the rejection of intuitionism by classical mathematicians are neither rational nor scientific. Nor are the pragmatic reasons, based on a conviction that classical mathematics is better for applications to physics or other sciences than is intuitionism. They are all emotional reasons, grounded in a deep sense as to what mathematics is all about. (If one of the readers knows of a truly scientific rejection of intuitionism, the author would be grateful to hear about it.)” - Mathematics Magazine, p. 212

The Formalists lost the intuitive knowledge of "mathematics as a technology". Even when directly confronted about this reliance and offered the viable alternative of Intuitionism, they still cling to the comfort elaborate language. (Perhaps mathematics is simply following the lead of physics.)

Where to from Here?

“One law for the Lion and Ox is Oppression.” - William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
When it comes to learning, one size does not fit all. 
I grew up learning to play piano from reading the sheet music. I became proficient at sight reading piano music, and memorizing a piece by playing a measure or two over and over until my hands could play the measure automatically, out of habit. But despite my extensive training and practice, I have no ability to play a song by ear. I tried to play a measure of John Lennon’s Jealous Guy by listening to the piano part on Youtube, and I could not correctly hear the notes. All of my learning is mediated through the sheet music--my intuitive knowledge of playing piano is still that of a beginner.

When Elton John was 11 he could recite a 4 page Handel piece after hearing it just once. Imagine what the world would have missed out on if Elton John had been forced to learn to play from the sheet music instead of playing by ear. But that’s exactly how we are teaching mathematics today.

We need to teach student to “play math by ear.” What I mean is that students should learn mathematics intuitively, instead of a programmed instruction. At least, they should know that math can be done that way.

Our culture is obsessed with translating intuitive knowledge into a system of rules, but we don’t know how to translate it back the other way. We need to learn.

We need lesson plans that start from the rule-based knowledge of the Common Core Curriculum and create activities that stimulate intuitive knowledge for kids. To do this, I believe, teachers need to put passion, not necessarily into their relationships with students, but into the content that they teach. But isn’t it the students that bring the subject to life? I have to say “no.” I believe that subjects like mathematics and literature have a life of their own--not as a living organism, of course, but as the movements of culture.

G.W.F. Hegel famously wrote of Caesar:
“It was not, then, his private gain merely, but an unconscious impulse that occasioned the accomplishment of that for which the time was ripe. Such are all great historical men — whose own particular aims involve those large issues which are the will of the World-Spirit. They may be called Heroes, inasmuch as they have derived their purposes and their vocation, not from the calm, regular course of things, sanctioned by the existing order; but from a concealed fount — one which has not attained to phenomenal, present existence, — from that inner Spirit, still hidden beneath the surface, which, impinging on the outer world as on a shell, bursts it in pieces...
“Such individuals had no consciousness of the general Idea they were unfolding, while prosecuting those aims of theirs; on the contrary, they were practical, political men. But at the same time they were thinking men, who had an insight into the requirements of the time — what
was ripe for development. … For that Spirit which had taken this fresh step in history is the inmost soul of all individuals; but in a state of unconsciousness which the great men in question aroused. Their fellows, therefore, follow these soul-leaders; for they feel the irresistible power of their own inner Spirit thus embodied.”

To create a historic change today, we need teachers who put thought into their work, and develop “insight into what is ripe for development” in technology and in our economy. Hegel explains here that historical change does not literally require individuals to “take the sword of the spirit” as St. Paul recommends in Ephesians. Hegel claims the requirements for change are thinking and insight. Whether St. Paul meant to limit his followers to a literal interpretation of the Gospel is a controversial topic. Perhaps “the sword of the spirit, which is the Word of God” means something much broader. It is such a broader “World-Spirit” that teachers must tap into in order that their students may develop an intuitive knowledge of the economic context and technological significance of the mathematical procedures they are being taught.

Saturday, December 12, 2015

Zac Hassan's Review of The God of the Left Hemisphere: Blake, Bolte-Taylor, and the Myth of Creation

The author [Roderick Tweedy]'s analyses of the profound connections between Blake's figure of 'Urizen' and the complex of left-hemisphere activities, of Jill Bolte Taylor's case of brain lateralization due to a hemorrhage in the left brain, as well as of compelling new discoveries in modern neuroscience, all converge into a discussion that suggests a rather radical reinterpretation of the 'God' of Creation texts.

Parallel to its analysis of the relationship between brain lateralization and the psychological basis for the God referred to in these early texts, the author pursues a line of inquiry into the relationship between Reason, or the complex of rationalizing and ordering processes identified as the left hemisphere, Morality, and psychopathology. The author explains how religion and science have developed as a result of the emerging dominance of the left brain over the right brain, and how the historical discrimination against the right brain has resulted in the cultivation of psychopathology, which is ubiquitous in modern society.

The main argument of the book is that 'Urizen' is [an instantiation of] the left brain, and that Blake is unique because he recognized the 'God' of the Book of Genesis to be Reason personified, and hence referred to it as 'Urizen' or the 'Holy Reasoning Power'. This God is a creator by division and abstraction, which are employed in order to impose order on reality. The author shows throughout the book just how this brain function on the one hand, and daemonic power or personality on the other, manifest in human nature.

The basic drive of the God of the left hemisphere - or Urizen, the left brain - is a need for control and dominance, which stems from existential angst: a fear of emotion, and indeed, of being alive. The promise in worshipping Reason, by obeying laws and moral codes, is to assuage the fear of uncertainty and to achieve a semblance of predictability. Thus, Reason creates a world where the human is a physical machine on one end and a statistical unit on the other, where man becomes regular either way. In the former he is a predictable material object and in the latter a predictable mathematical concept. This is post-enlightenment philosophy in a nutshell, and schizophrenia is the embodiment of such a phenomenological state.

The emergence of left-hemisphere dominance has been a process of increasing doubt in immediate and embodied subjective reality, which, according to Blake, has subsequently led to a separation of the human from the divine. It is important to note here that Blake thought of divinity as an empathic mode of attention in relation to another, which, the author adds, can be accessed through the right hemisphere. This severance from what Blake referred to as Energy, or the bodily and imaginative (the right brain), is responsible for the loss of emotion, spontaneity, and vitality, and the consequent enslavement to a state of rationalizing and egoic compulsion. Blake identified the traditional ‘Satan‘ as a personification of this state. The controversial assertion is that the devil resides not in hell but in the human brain, and more specifically in the left hemisphere.

Blake exposed the concealed moralistic dimension of rationality: that Reason is evaluative and ego-centric and not neutral or objective. The author empirically corroborates this by demonstrating that Reason and Morality have a common neurological source rooted in left-hemisphere networks, where the complex of processes that are commonly referred to as ‘ego' are located. Therefore, there is no actual opposition between Science and Religion, because these two systems are two versions of the same thing ‘battling for supremacy over the left hemisphere‘ (p. 93). Instead, ‘the real clash [is] between rationality and imagination’ (ibid.), which is to say between the left and the right hemisphere.

To summarize: the greatest trick the devil pulled was not only to convince human-kind that he does not exist, but to be worshiped under the guise of Morality by the theistic adherents of religion and under the guise of Reason by the atheistic adherents of Science. Needless to say, this thesis is challenging to both parties. Nevertheless, there is hope, the author reassures the reader. Salvation lies in repentance: by returning to the God of the right hemisphere, and thereby silencing the left hemisphere. But be not alarmed, for this kind of repentance does not depend on supernatural grace but on neuroplasticity. The author is calling for an end to the discrimination against the right hemisphere, and recommends the educational system as a good place from which to start.

2015. Zac Hassan

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Math is a Language and a Technology

Math educators have a “split-personality” approach to mathematics. On the one hand, math is the ancient, other-worldly Platonic paragon of Reason, while on the other hand, math is the present-day, natural engine that runs technological optimization and scientific invention.

Neither of these views are wrong--the problem is in attributing one view to the past and the other to the present. Math has always been both language and technology.

n fact, math is one of the earliest technologies of our species, numbers having preceded writing by thousands of years. 

When we write out mathematical calculations by hand, all we are doing is using an outdated piece of technology. Calculating by hand is outdated today because computers are much better at it. The difference is comparable to driving a horse and buggy instead of a car. Sure, before calculators were omnipresent, calculating-by-hand was quite a valuable skill. During WWII “computers”--not machines, but humans hired to crunch numbers all day long--were hired by the US military and paid a salary of $1,440, the 2015 equivalent of $20,000. Calculators changed that, but apparently educators were the last ones to notice! 

The counter-argument has always been, “we teach math for students to learn logical reasoning.” It’s true that mathematical arguments follow reasoning and a formal logic. But it is dishonest to say that is how math is being taught today. The focus today is on getting students to reproduce the procedures, not be able to logically prove them.  

The larger point is that it is a mistake to see Reason as math’s biggest contribution to society. Mathematics does not hold a monopoly on reasoning, despite what Stephen Hawking says. Pascal recognized this almost 400 years ago, writing, “Custom is the source of our strongest and most believed proofs. It bends the automaton, which persuades the mind without its thinking about the matter.” Claiming that mathematics education is primarily about reasoning is like a corporate CEO claiming the advertising division’s primary focus is creating beautiful cinematography or the military claiming that marksmanship training is primarily for the Olympics skeet shooting competition.

Mathematics as language is about Reasoning. Mathematics as calculation is about technological progress.

Our society has no problems letting computers determine our economics (which in turn runs our politics)--but for a student to use a computer to solve a quadratic equation is cheating. Rather than calculation-by-hand, we might as well be teaching students to use slide rules or, better yet, play video games. 

Even the Common Core's math standards, while a useful idea in principle, are hopelessly stuck in the calculation-by-hand philosophy. And they could not have been implemented at a worse time. Teachers are increasingly teaching to the test at a time when they should be experimenting within the new digital world to cultivate students’ curiosities into interests and passions. This is especially true of math, which lends itself to digital learning more than other subjects.

Isaac Asimov wonderfully named the split-personality mindset that mathematicians (and many others in our society) have historically suffered from: Spacer ideology.
- “Space-out” when discussing the downsides to a technology.
- Outsource as much human labor to machines as possible.
- Blindly trust that technological progress is the same as social progress.

So what about education, specifically, has prevented this outsourcing of computational labor to computers in math classrooms? Mark Weston identifies the “lack of school-level support” for helpful educational technologies, combined with the entire field of education “ignoring its own research” and “failing to investigate and build consensus about how to take what works to scale.”

Math teachers across the world, take action before it’s too late! As math teachers, we have to learn to coexist with digital technology. The organization Computer-Based Math laid this information out years ago, but it’s calls have largely gone unheeded. Don’t resist it any longer!

Strive to find the balance between the two extremes. Don’t fall for the promise of easy technological fixes, but also don’t refuse technology altogether. Instead, collaborate. Seek out other educators to figure out what works. Move into the networked reality of our “Spacer” global economy, while keeping a critical awareness of the potential downsides to technology, and not abandoning the logical, linguistic foundations of math.